Restoration of Southwark Bridge completed

Southwark Bridge
After three years of grit-blasting, scaffolding and polyethylene wraps, Southwark Bridge has been returned to its original bright colours of green and yellow. More than 1,000 tonnes of expandable abrasive was used to blast South Bridge back to its bare metal framework, before being repainted using some 13,000 litres of paint. You can find more images of Southwark Bridge at www.cityheritage.info Before...

Scaffolding on Span 4 of Southwark Bridge

Scaffolding on Span 4 as seen from Thames Path
Industrial painting contractors continue to erect scaffolding around Span 4 on Southwark Bridge. The whole section will be encapsulated with polythene wraps to catch old paintwork as it falls, protecting Thames river life. Scaffolding on Southwark Bridge Southwark Bridge lampstand with the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral in the background The scaffolding on Span 4 – looking north from Thames...

Polythene wraps on Southwark Bridge

Span 2 (west side) enclosed with polythene wraps
Polythene wraps have now been applied to the east and west sides of Span 2. The generators and compressors have been delivered at Southwark Bridge and work on grit blasting the underside will begin shortly. Southwark Bridge as seen from the Millennium Bridge Span 2 (west side) enclosed with polythene wraps The compressors and generators arrive at Southwark Bridge The compressors and generators on Southwark...

The Millennium Bridge

The Millenium Bridge
In 1996 Southwark Council in conjunction with the Financial Times and the Royal Institute of British Architects organized a competition for the design of a new bridge across the Thames. The event was won by the dazzling “blade of light” design envisioned by Arup (engineers), Foster and Partners (architects) and Sir Anthony Caro (sculptor), and just four years later on June 10th 2000 the Millennium...

Old Southwark Bridge

southwark-bridge-1828
In May, 1811, a Bill was passed for the erection of a new bridge to cross the Thames about a quarter of a mile west of London Bridge, and to be known as Southwark Bridge. The work was undertaken by a private company, and the cost stated to have been about £800,000, though it would appear from contemporary records to have been considerably less. The architect, John Rennie, F.R.S. (who afterwards built...